Motorcycle Consolidation


Last week I purged the inventory to make way for my latest mechanical acquisition. My trials bike went to a good home locally and the Transalp took a road trip to Colorado with its new owner. All this effort was to make way for a new motorcycle that is comfortable two-up and more capable on the highway.

It’s a 1995 BMW R1100 GS.

I found it on eBay and hauled it home from Hot Springs, Arkansas. It has high mileage (for a bike, not for a BMW I’m told) and some loose bolts here and there. But it’s getting sorted out and promises to be a fun bike. Most importantly, it has met with the approval of My Passenger.

Sold by Weight…
Pound for pound I’ve made a pretty good swap. My observed trials bike was a 170 pound Beta and the Honda Transalp was around 400 lbs. The towering Bimmer is a 500 pounder but easily hauls another couple of hundred if you fill up the topbox and pannier cases. So far I have no plans to re-create the Long Way Round, but I am hoping to get back on the road and take some longer trips.

Can I Really Make Money with My Web Site?

If you have a web site or blog, even though you may not know it, you are a publisher. And your “publication” has the potential to refer or inform somebody’s potential customer.

The answer is yes.
About ten years ago I began experimenting with what was then a fledgling industry: affiliate marketing. The concept is simple and predates the New World of cyberspace: I’ll pay you to send me a customer.

The basic idea falls into three main categories:
Pay per Click paid when someone clicks the link
Pay per Action paid when someone clicks link and does something
Pay per View (or impression) paid when the ad is viewed or displayed
You’ll sometimes see acronyms like CPA, this describes “cost per action” which is the same thing as “pay per action” but from the merchant or advertiser’s point of view. In other words, to pay you it will cost him. These all relate back to the basic concept of paying you to send someone a customer.

Worthy Links to Revenue
Here is a list of the most reputable affiliate providers and my less-than-scientific observations on each.

  • Share a Sale
    Combined payments and easy access to product datafeeds are a big plus for this up-and-comer. Don’t expect to find the Fortune 500 here, their specialty is smaller retailers that can’t afford the huge up-front costs of the larger services. If you’re looking for niche markets this is great place to start.
  • Link Share
    Ever-improving network of advertisers make this provider a must see. A wide variety of companies in all sizes work with Link Share. Linking interface is a little clumsy and doesn’t allow for much flexibility. Datafeeds are only available if you pay for them. WTF?!?
  • Clix Galore
    These folks are heavy on the Aussie merchants, although U.S. companies are also players. They combine payments too which is nice. Managing links is a little clunky but the reporting interface is good.
  • Commission Junction
    The biggest player in the affiliate marketing game. CJ combines payments and offers one of the most elite advertiser lists out there. Their “Smart Zone” feature is still the best in the biz and works with advertiser’s product datafeeds.
  • Google Ad Sense
    As usual Google is a new arrival on the scene and has taken a novel approach. It’s basically a pay-per-click program but with a twist. The ads displayed on your site are based on the content of your page. Advertisers bid on keywords and Google shares the revenue with you if a visitor clicks the link.
  • Valueclick
    If you have a high-traffic site you should consider visiting these folks. They are biggies in the pay-per-impression and pay-per-click advertising. Their advanced user interface allows you setup defaults and alternate network ads as you see fit.
  • Burst Media
    Burst is another CPM network and they specialize in working with niche publishers. This is a good fit if you have a forum or blog.

This is only a partial list of course, and it’s growing all the time.

How it WorksSpeaking of Pixels
The size of computer monitors vary greatly. Measurements on the web aren’t stated in inches because computer monitors, like most of the world, doesn’t know what an inch is. While I surf along with a 15″ CRT you may be staring at a 30″ plasma flat panel, and then you have the guy who looks at a web page using a cell phone. All three of these screens have different ideas of what an “inch” is. However, they all have pixels.

That’s why you see banner ads described as 468 x 60 as opposed to something you’d find on a ruler. The dimension is always width first, then height. Common sizes of web site ads these days include 468×60, 728×90, 120×60, 120×600, 160×600, 300×250, 125×125 and 250×250.

Whew.
You join an affiliate program and they provide you a blob of script or a special code. You paste this special link on your web site– it may take the form of a graphic or plain text. The important thing is when someone clicks on this link it identifies you to the advertiser or merchant as the source or referrer. Sort of a 21st century version of, “Who sent ya’?” Then, depending on the payment terms, you get credited for sending the visitor.

In the early days affiliate marketing was more or less based on the venerable banner ad. Most any site worth a GIF sprouted advertising across the top of the page in the form of the now familiar rectangle measuring 468 pixels wide and 60 pixels tall. Today affiliate marketing includes rotating banners, product datafeeds, contextual text ads, keyword searches and search engine marketing.

Getting Beyond Basics
Before you can make any money you’ll need to sign up with an affiliate program. These come in many different shapes and sizes, but fall into two main categories: program providers and merchant program.

Providers are companies that offer merchants/advertisers a way to manage their affiliate program without actually having to “manage” it. The provider handles all the record-keeping, serving up the links and paying the affiliates. You’ll find a list of the most popular affiliate program providers below.

Merchant programs are simply affiliate systems that are not managed by a third party. In other words, the advertiser themselves take care of the bookkeeping and link management. Most of the time this method is used by smaller organizations, but not always.

Affiliate network providers offer you one-stop access to many advertisers. They usually have the horsepower to serve up links and banner ads without a glitch. Some of them combine payments, which can speed things up and reduce the chance of small amounts being trapped in limbo. On the other hand, most self-managed programs offer higher commissions. This is simply because they don’t have to pay a third party.

I hope this article was helpful for those of you considering the possibilities.

Radio Milan CD Now Available

In a former life I was a musical artist.

If anyone remembers Tulsa’s new wave scene back in the early `80s they will remember Radio Milan. If you never inhaled you might also recall The Insects. That was the first name of this musical experiment, the name was changed to Radio Milan in 1982. We disbanded in 1987 after a terrible performance as the opening act for Wang Chung.

Radio Milan T-Shirt DesignRecordings from this golden age of punk are now available to the world through the miracle of the Internet!

Radio Milan: The Jim Anthology

The first tracks are Radio Milan recordings that were released in 1986 as a cassette tape titled Musica la Dolce. Next up is the recording of “Mille Miglia” we offered up for the Explosive Sampler. This CD also features live recordings from a rare television appearance and the Crystal Pistol.

There are a total of 20 tracks on the CD and you can listen to samples of all of them at CD Freedom

Update:

June 29, 2008- Digital downloads are now available of selected Radio Milan and Insects music. The first batch are the six songs from the Musica La Dolcé cassette, originally released in 1986. Watch for more classic hits from the Eighties to be added soon.

www.nimbitmusic.com/radiomilan

We are sinking!

A friend from Muskogee sent me this and I laughed my arse off. Funniest thing I’d seen in a while.

http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?videoUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fvp.video.google.com%2Fvideodownload%3Fversion%3D0%26secureurl%3DkgAAAOJqZLz10uNQrIOPKIk1IbSDFLHR6dm28E5Ib0Z9Vt9yddBZBZH2WmWyMijZDAnZuYLZizCs9bJ82g51ekD8dYepU97wSnX1nIPkKjN8I9XRWNjJc8Y-c6WeVCgfX9rYzOgOML-Z_Z9jm8kjN7RpZeg56LO5rUZ-lYHDoovCxPo0BioZ3Pxzb8AYMym4PtCLX9N8qMA5PhwXAbwstUV2RYc%26sigh%3DxsSLXiDAM8s6jeY3dSH9gWpfpVA%26begin%3D0%26len%3D40280%26docid%3D-6801926416414761527&thumbnailUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo.google.com%2FThumbnailServer%3Fcontentid%3Dd75ee960967bc70b%26second%3D5%26itag%3Dw320%26urlcreated%3D1140009327%26sigh%3DYyz3-WBhwm-t6n18a6DqVkduSvs&playerId=-6801926416414761527&playerMode=embedded

The Machines I Have Known

A Work in Progress

I thought it might be fun to catalog all of the motorcycles I have owned. So here goes– beginning in 1974 and my fourteenth birthday….

1970 Speedway Super Spyder

This was a Sachs 125-powered dirt bike with 15″ wheels. They were built by a mini bike company in Florida and the Spyder (the “Y” made it even cooler) was their top of the line Big Bike.

Like most things I got for my birthday, this one was broken. Dad and I put it together from a basket full of two motors. It hauled ass but had a habit of mis-shifting if you revved it too high.

1978 Kawasaki KZ650 SR

KZ650-SR in front of the Oklahoma capitol.

I traded a `74 Fiat 124 Spider for this bike (no “Y” so it had to go). Such a sweet ride. Damn reliable motorcycles and not bad to look at either. If you frequented the Bleu Grotto you most likely saw the SR parked out front.

1981 Kawasaki KZ750
Didn’t have this bike very long. Probably had something to do with Jackie burning her leg on the muffler. My bad.

1989 Kawasaki KDX200

Me and the KDX during a trail ride near Prattville, OK

After a long hiatus it became apparent I never got the “dirt bike thing” out of my system. I bought the KDX and returned to motorcycling circa 1997.

It was a great bike for rejuvenating those long dormant genes. Cheap and plentiful, and just new enough to have a power valve to soften that two-stroke powerband.

The KDX is a versatile trail bike and I’d recommend one to anyone wanting to go play in the dirt. Scratch that… I’d recommend one to anyone. Everybody needs a KDX or two.

1995 Kawasaki KLR650

This dual sport was my first street bike in about 15 years.

It was originally this bizarre turquoise color but I changed out the plastic for the earlier blue color. The anemic muffler was replaced with a Cobra can that sounded nice and weighed several pounds less.

KLRs are fun. The 650cc single is a huffer. I had fun exploring gravel roads and some dirt trails. Getting very “dirty” was not so much fun. It’s just a little too big and heavy and underpowered to go very far off-road.

But the worst part of the ride is getting to the trail. Three chains and two balance shafts later they still vibrate your dentures loose.

1996 Triumph 900 Sprint

The only brand new motorcycle I ever bought. Hell, it’s the only new vehicle of any kind I’ve ever bought. Picked it up brand new from Atlas in 1999 (yes, it was brand new but three years old). This was our return to a real street bike and we took some wonderful trips on it.

Jackie still curses me for selling the Sprint (or Trumpy as she calls it). Comfortable bike, good power, smooth and reliable. But what a doggone top-heavy sumbitch. When these early Triumphs are dropped it’s usually in a parking lot doing about 6 mph.

What it lacked around town it redeemed on the open road. These early Hinckley Triumphs are well-built and the Sprint is a fine sport-tourer. That soft luggage is made in New Zealand by a company called Ventura. That’s great stuff too.

1994 Kawasaki KX250

This was my last “dirt bike” and was modified for trail riding. It had an A-Loop flywheel and fatty pipe to make it less a motocrosser and more a woods bike. Very fun. Still very fast.

I raced a season of cross-country with the OCCRA boys and decided I was too old for bouncing off of trees. Had a lot of fun and, fortunately, never really got hurt. Knock on wood.

Bad puns aside- after I sold this I quit racing off-road and started learning how to ride observed trials.

And now for something completely different.

1989 Aprilia 280 Climber
The Climber (in the background of the photo below) introduced me to observed trials riding and that was a real eye opener.

These bikes worked great for Tommy Ahvala. Didn’t work as well for me. The Rotax had a habit of selecting gears on its own despite the rider’s suggestion. I rode it one season and decided I liked trials enough to get a more modern bike.

1997 Beta Techno
A proper trails machine.

The photo shows the Beta shortly after arriving from Portland, Oregon and the Climber preparing to leave for California. We kept the Forward Air truck line in business that month!

The Techno was a fun motorcycle. It was the uprated version with the 280cc mod and could yank stumps right out of the ground! Of all the Italian machinery I’ve owned the Betas have to be the best built. Very well made.

1989 Honda XL600V Transalp
My next street bike was a cult bike I’d long admired. This Transalp came up on eBay and I knew it was worth a shot when I read the location: Woodward, Oklahoma. Who the hell within 100 miles of Woodward ever even heard of a Transalp?!?

To this day the Transalp is one of the most popular Hondas in Europe. But they didn’t sell squat in the US. They were only sold in `89 and `90, long before the term “dual sport” was even coined. But it’s no surprise they didn’t sell here- much too practical a motorcycle for the American market.

I really enjoyed riding this bike. Around town it’s great. Smooth 600cc V-twin and great, neutral handling. But on the highway or two-up the twin starts to show its relative lack of ponies.

2003 Beta Rev 3

More fine Italian aluminum. An excellent machine and an absolute blast to ride.

The Techno was getting tired and saggy in the rear end (quiet in back, please) and all signs pointed to the monoshock. Instead of shelling out for a replacement I sent it off to teach another newbie rider and bought myself a Rev 3.

Unfortunately my back started giving me trouble and I wasn’t dedicated enough to keep risking serious injury. This was my last trials bike.

1995 BMW R1100GS
I was hanging out at Brookside Motorcycle Company one day and made the mistake of riding a GS. I loved it.

I picked this GS up on eBay with full bags and an Aeroflow windscreen. Thought I got a great deal. Turned out it wasn’t such a great deal after all. A persistent problem kept it from making any go after about 2/3 throttle. Otherwise it ran great!

We had a few good trips on it (Show Me Mo)– enough to convince me I really like the BMW thing. The GS is a versatile machine that easily handles the gravel roads and far off trails, and it’s comfortable enough to take you to them. Jackie found it comfortable and only wished it would dependably run right! I could never cure the running problem and it made long-distance touring a real headache. I sold it and…

2003 BMW R1150R

..that brings us to the latest beemer.

This is a sweet bike. I bought it from a fellow in New Mexico (road trip) with only 16k miles. It originally came from Dallas and has been well cared for (unlike the aforementioned BMW).

I wanted another GS but they demand a premium price. Hey, they’re an icon. For the price of a mid to late nineties GS we’re stylin’ on a 2003 R. And I like it.

The R is also able to get it’s feet a little dirty. With the right tires some people get downright “off road” with them. But most importantly it’s comfortable two-up and handles great. Highway cruising really is cruising with the motor ticking along less than 4000 RPM at 80 mph.

Update: August 2009

2005 BMW R1200GS
R1150R meets its replacement: R1200GS

Okay, I admit it. I’m a GS guy.

The R (see above) is a great bike. But if the road turns into gravel or Jackie and I want to do some serious miles, it’s not the best choice. I’m just a freak for versatility, and the GS is versatile. Tour all day, explore a gravel road, commute in heavy traffic, you name it and it does it all pretty darn well.

When I found this `05 GS available for well below book I had to have a look. It’s a beauty, matches my helmet and is well farkled, so we made the trek across Missouri to buy it.


 

Alfa Romeo GTV during a trackside yoga session at Hallett
The End
(for now)
Not really. I’ll update this as time goes by.